Grimes ft. Blood Diamonds - “Go”

Grimes dubstep come back with tribute to Dante’s Inferno

End stigma by treating mental illness as what it is

Psychology is the software; biology is the hardware. Mental illness can’t be simply reduced to a “brain disorder.” It has a dual nature. Calling mental illnesses as “brain disorders” defeats the purpose of reducing stigma by illegitimizing its very real psychological origins… /endrant.

"There is only one valuable thing in art: the thing you cannot explain."

Georges Braque, born on this day in 1882. (via sfmoma)

(via acrylicalchemy)

Oh Renoir, are you teasing me? #Coupleseverywhere #Renoir #theGetty #art #LA

Oh Renoir, are you teasing me? #Coupleseverywhere #Renoir #theGetty #art #LA

"I write and that way rid myself of me and then at last I can rest."

— Clarice Lispector (via writingquotes)

neurosciencestuff:

Breastfeeding linked to lower risk of postnatal depression
A new study of over 10,000 mothers has shown that women who breastfed their babies were at significantly lower risk of postnatal depression than those who did not.
A new study of over 10,000 mothers has shown that women who breastfed their babies were at significantly lower risk of postnatal depression than those who did not.
The study, by researchers in the UK and Spain, and published today in the journal Maternal and Child Health, shows that mothers who planned to breastfeed and who actually went on to breastfeed were around 50% less likely to become depressed than mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed. Mothers who planned to breastfeed, but who did not go on to breastfeed, were over twice as likely to become depressed as mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed.
The relationship between breastfeeding and depression was most pronounced when babies were 8 weeks old, but much smaller when babies were 8 months or older.
The research, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, used data drawn from the Avon Longitudinal Survey of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a study of 13,998 births in the Bristol area in the early 1990s. Maternal depression was measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale when babies were 8 weeks, and 8, 21 and 33 months old. Depression was also assessed at two points during pregnancy, enabling the researchers to take into account mothers’ pre-existing mental health conditions.
This is one of the largest studies of its kind; as well as being one of the few studies taking into account mothers’ previous mental health, it also controls for socioeconomic factors such as income and relationship status, and for other potential confounders such as how babies were delivered, and whether they were premature.
“Breastfeeding has well-established benefits to babies, in terms of their physical health and cognitive development; our study shows that it also benefits the mental health of mothers,” says Dr Maria Iacovou, from the University of Cambridge’s Department of Sociology and a Bye Fellow at Fitzwilliam College.
“In fact, the effects on mothers’ mental health that we report in this study are also likely to have an impact on babies, since maternal depression has previously been shown to have negative effects on many aspects of children’s development.”
Dr Iacovou believes that health authorities should not only be encouraging women to breastfeed, but should also provide a level of support that will help mothers who want to breastfeed succeed.
“Lots of mothers and babies take to breastfeeding pretty easily. But for many others, it doesn’t come naturally at all; for these mothers, having someone with the training, the skills, and perhaps most importantly the time to help them get it right, can make all the difference,” she adds.
“However good the level of support that’s provided, there will be some mothers who wanted to breastfeed and who don’t manage to. It’s clear that these mothers need a great deal of understanding and support; there is currently hardly any skilled specialist help for these mothers, and this is something else that health providers should be thinking about.”
Around one in 12 women in the sample experienced depressive symptoms during pregnancy, while one in eight experienced depression at one or more of the four measurement points after giving birth.
According to figures from the UK’s Department of Health, almost three-quarters of mothers initiated breastfeeding in 2012/13; by the time of the 6-8 week check, only 47% of babies were being breastfed. This is one of the lowest rates of breastfeeding in Europe.

neurosciencestuff:

Breastfeeding linked to lower risk of postnatal depression

A new study of over 10,000 mothers has shown that women who breastfed their babies were at significantly lower risk of postnatal depression than those who did not.

A new study of over 10,000 mothers has shown that women who breastfed their babies were at significantly lower risk of postnatal depression than those who did not.

The study, by researchers in the UK and Spain, and published today in the journal Maternal and Child Health, shows that mothers who planned to breastfeed and who actually went on to breastfeed were around 50% less likely to become depressed than mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed. Mothers who planned to breastfeed, but who did not go on to breastfeed, were over twice as likely to become depressed as mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed.

The relationship between breastfeeding and depression was most pronounced when babies were 8 weeks old, but much smaller when babies were 8 months or older.

The research, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, used data drawn from the Avon Longitudinal Survey of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a study of 13,998 births in the Bristol area in the early 1990s. Maternal depression was measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale when babies were 8 weeks, and 8, 21 and 33 months old. Depression was also assessed at two points during pregnancy, enabling the researchers to take into account mothers’ pre-existing mental health conditions.

This is one of the largest studies of its kind; as well as being one of the few studies taking into account mothers’ previous mental health, it also controls for socioeconomic factors such as income and relationship status, and for other potential confounders such as how babies were delivered, and whether they were premature.

“Breastfeeding has well-established benefits to babies, in terms of their physical health and cognitive development; our study shows that it also benefits the mental health of mothers,” says Dr Maria Iacovou, from the University of Cambridge’s Department of Sociology and a Bye Fellow at Fitzwilliam College.

“In fact, the effects on mothers’ mental health that we report in this study are also likely to have an impact on babies, since maternal depression has previously been shown to have negative effects on many aspects of children’s development.”

Dr Iacovou believes that health authorities should not only be encouraging women to breastfeed, but should also provide a level of support that will help mothers who want to breastfeed succeed.

“Lots of mothers and babies take to breastfeeding pretty easily. But for many others, it doesn’t come naturally at all; for these mothers, having someone with the training, the skills, and perhaps most importantly the time to help them get it right, can make all the difference,” she adds.

“However good the level of support that’s provided, there will be some mothers who wanted to breastfeed and who don’t manage to. It’s clear that these mothers need a great deal of understanding and support; there is currently hardly any skilled specialist help for these mothers, and this is something else that health providers should be thinking about.”

Around one in 12 women in the sample experienced depressive symptoms during pregnancy, while one in eight experienced depression at one or more of the four measurement points after giving birth.

According to figures from the UK’s Department of Health, almost three-quarters of mothers initiated breastfeeding in 2012/13; by the time of the 6-8 week check, only 47% of babies were being breastfed. This is one of the lowest rates of breastfeeding in Europe.

sammy-got-pimped-for-pie:

In honor of back-to-school.

sammy-got-pimped-for-pie:

In honor of back-to-school.

(via aggressivelytwerkinganderson)

"You never need to apologize
for how you chose to survive."

— Clementine von Radics (via journalofanobody)

(via imanopenbookinstead)

"If you’re lonely, bored, or unhappy, remember you are mad young. There is so much time to meet new people and go to new places."

— Ezra Koenig (via antisocool)

(Source: whorchacha, via ijustdomything)

msnbc:


"From 2006 to 2012, a white police officer killed a black person at least twice a week in this country." - MHP

Melissa Harris-Perry gives a heart-wrenching tribute to the deaths of black men that have occurred at the hands of police in the past decade.

msnbc:

"From 2006 to 2012, a white police officer killed a black person at least twice a week in this country." - MHP

Melissa Harris-Perry gives a heart-wrenching tribute to the deaths of black men that have occurred at the hands of police in the past decade.

(via aggressivelytwerkinganderson)

massconflict:

A woman kneels on the street amid tear gas during a demonstration over the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown by a police officer in Missouri.
Aug. 18, 2014

massconflict:

A woman kneels on the street amid tear gas during a demonstration over the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown by a police officer in Missouri.

Aug. 18, 2014

(via aggressivelytwerkinganderson)

(Source: -teesa-, via cynical-as-hell)

awkward-fallen-angel:

spooniestrong:

electricarc:

view fullsize
Been playing with this concept for a while.

I love this. So much.

this should be posted everywhere

awkward-fallen-angel:

spooniestrong:

electricarc:

view fullsize

Been playing with this concept for a while.

I love this. So much.

this should be posted everywhere

(via fighting-butterflies)

imanopenbookinstead:

Creds to my friend Tayler for painting the watercolour part of this doodle.

imanopenbookinstead:

Creds to my friend Tayler for painting the watercolour part of this doodle.

(via imanopenbookinstead)

8/12/14

Realizing the fragility of human life.

Dear God—if you exist, I know you exist— please take care of D.M. Please let her be free from pain and be surrounded by beautiful idyllic memories of her family and friends.

Dear God, please keep S.M. and his family overcome their sorrow and be surrounded by beautiful idyllic memories of D.M.

Amen

Rip d.m.